How are you going to exit your business?

This is a question that continuously exercises all business owners. How are they going to leverage their business to support their desired lifestyle when they want to stop working? This article explores some of the main areas you might consider to increase your chances of achieving your end goal in relation to your business.

What are your goals?

First of all, think about what is important to you in terms of exiting your business. Do you have a particular timeframe in mind? Are you looking to “get out early” and maybe have a long, but relatively modest retirement? Or are you looking to work hard well into your 60’s (or later) and then sell your business to fund a more prosperous retirement? If so, it’s important to be working towards a definite end date. Or are you looking to build a business that will continue after you’re gone, possibly headed up by one of your children, a business that may also support you in retirement?

These are really important decisions to think about now, as they will influence what’s important in achieving your goals. Will it be all about maximising the value of the business on a certain date in the future or are you trying to build extremely deep relationships between your clients and your business that will endure after you’ve exited?

Know what your business is

Now you’ve got to be really honest with yourself. What do you have to sell? Is it actually a business or simply a consultancy service? For some Financial Brokers, they’ve built up a thriving business in which they are the conductor of the orchestra, where the value is not based purely on their own presence in the business. These businesses are obviously very attractive to potential buyers. Then there are other businesses in which the value all revolves around the business owner. Take the owner out of the equation and what is there? While these businesses may offer a nice lifestyle to the owner, they are a far more challenging proposition when it comes to trying to sell.

If you own a business that is based on you as the key asset and you have ambitions to sell it one day, you need to start thinking about how you will develop some saleable value within your business.

Where is the value in your business?

So let’s assume that there is potential value in your business, outside of your own input and that your aim is to actually sell your business. Now it’s time to try and maximise the value of all of your assets. These might include;

  • Financial Assets: An obvious one to start. The main asset that a prospective purchaser will pay for is the future income stream of your business.
  • Persistency: The next thing a buyer will look for is the persistency of your business as this will be a key influencer of the potential future income stream. This will give them a sense of the quality of the “book” of clients that they are buying.
  • Brand: if your brand is well known and seen as a trustworthy brand, there is definite value in this for a buyer.
  • Staff: If you have a team of highly qualified, revenue generating people that will remain in the business, they are a very valuable asset to the business.
  • Market Positioning: If you have a recognised presence in some attractive market segments and niche areas, these may open up new opportunities to a potential buyer.
  • Operational Excellence: If your service proposition, compliance and data management (among other) areas are very strong, these offer great opportunities for a buyer to leverage off the capabilities of your business.

Who will facilitate your exit?

This is another factor that you need to start thinking about well in advance. Who is likely to enable your exit from the business? Once you’ve identified the profile of your potential buyer, you can then work on making your business proposition as attractive as possible to them.

If your aim is that your business will continue with a new leader / owner of the business, you need to start identifying who your potential successors will be. Do you have fellow directors who will buy you out? Or do you have younger, ambitious individuals within the business who might want to take over after you’ve gone? If so, you need to identify these people and start putting in place structures and interim incentives to retain them, and to make it attractive for both you and them for a buyout to happen in the future.

If an external buyer is your preferred route, you need to start identifying particular candidates. Would your business be attractive to current competitors, either in your market segments or geographical area? How would your clients react to this? Are there firms trying to build presence in a niche where you already enjoy a strong presence?

And then, how do you alert potential buyers? Is it a quiet word or a public tender (which will alert your existing clients)? Or can you use the broker networks to gather interest?

How will they pay

Of course one of your main areas of interest will be how much you will get for your business and how the consideration will be paid! Will it be a straight cash deal or will there be some tie-ins into the future in the form of earn outs etc. And how will your firm be valued – are buyers likely to look at recurring income, profits or future cash flows? And which of these works best for you?

Lots of questions to consider! Now is the time to start thinking about them. The more thinking and preparation you do well ahead of your exit date, the more fit for purpose your sale proposition will be. And all of that is likely to result in a higher price for you.

What are the critical areas that you believe need to be considered when selling a financial advisory firm?